Shiny, DataTables, and replaceData

Some of the Shiny apps we’ve developed for a financial trading firm have pretty consistent requirements:

  1. Show a lot of data, and highlight the important stuff.
  2. Update that data frequently.

The DataTables library makes a lot of sense for those. It’s easy to use – just pop in a data.frame and by default you have a sortable, searchable, page-able table with a nice default style.

But then we noticed the client-side (browser) memory leak!

Over the course of 20 minutes, we saw the Javascript heap grow from 10-15 MB to 100+ MB, and keep on going.

Eventually the browser tab would crash, and the app had to be restarted.

After investigating, we noticed the server-side rendering function DT::renderDataTable actually creates a NEW instance of the DataTable every time it updates, rather than just updating the data in the existing table.

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Speeding Up A Shiny App: Future/Promise and Caching

We build a lot of Shiny apps, and most work fine without a lot of customization.

But special cases require some fine-tuning to get everything working correctly, especially with a lot of simultaneous users.

One recent app was built for a financial trading firm, and needed to be open and responsive for a large set of traders all day long.

But there was a major barrier: every five seconds, data needed to be pulled from a database on another continent back to the US, transformed with some relatively processor-intensive steps, and only then were results displayed on the screen…maybe only a second or two before the next update cycle would begin.

For one user, no problem – but for two, three, four, …, users? When using the open source version of Shiny Server, all sessions are working in a single R process, which means each session has to wait for other sessions to update first.

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Shiny, Google Maps, and Voronoi Diagrams

There was a comment on a recent Hacker News thread about a world airport Voronoi map that said “if only there was a webpage/software where someone could click/select points on a map…and a user Voronoi diagram would be created ;-).”

I knew such a tool already existed, but I thought I might as well try to implement one myself, so I put together the pieces:

  1. The deldir R package can quickly create Voronoi lines for a given set of two-dimensional points.
  2. Google Maps, since I knew how to handle events like clicking to add a point, dragging the points, and double-clicking to remove. Plus it’s easy to draw the Voronoi lines.
  3. Shiny can link that quick calculation of Voronoi lines with the front-end maps library API, so that user events and the server-side data stay in sync.

A live demo version is available on our Shiny demo server: https://shiny.modernresearchconsulting.com/create-voronoi

create-voronoi

The user interface is pretty simple – just click to add points, drag to change, and double-click to remove, and the Voronoi will update automatically.

There’s also an option to change the lines from straight to geodesics (following the curve of the earth).

The code is on Github and MIT-licensed.

I’d love to add a way to load sets of point at once (US state capitals, 100 tallest mountains, sports arenas, etc) when I have more time to work on this.

Winston-Salem Police Response Data

The previous post was all about an open data / open source strategy.

There’s plenty of data available from public sites that can be turned into useful tools, and one of the sources we’ve focused on recently is police response data.

Winston-Salem Police Department publishes a simple text file daily, containing information about all the responses from the previous day: report number, address, time of day, and the type of issue (for example, vandalism, motor vehicle theft, arson, etc.).

But the interface isn’t very useful: no aggregation, no filtering, no visualization, nothing but daily text files.

WSPD does contract with crimemapping.com to display individual responses on a map, which can be filtered going back several months, and users can even receive email alerts for activity within a specified radius of any address.

wspd-crimemapping

That’s great! But of course we wondered if an open-source tool would be possible.

So we’ve released a minimal version of a Shiny dashboard as an example:

https://shiny.modernresearchconsulting.com/wspd-response-dashboard/

And we’ve also released the source code here:

https://github.com/modernresearchconsulting/wspd-response-dashboard

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Shiny Versus What, Exactly?

When the early versions of Shiny were released in 2012, my career changed forever.

I’m not exaggerating. Shiny generalized data analysis – instead of tweaking code and parameters and plots every time a client needed to see a slight variation of existing output, I could build a user interface that would produce the same analysis for ANY inputs.

The researcher could check for themselves, without needing a round trip back to me. We could move faster, and more effectively.

Five years late, Shiny has no equal.

Continue reading “Shiny Versus What, Exactly?”